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Mariam's BookMariam Thalos Publishes New Book

Mariam Thalos, Department of Philosophy, recently published her new book "A Social Theory of Freedom."

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OlympicsChristopher Lewis Discusses Rio Olympics on “Top of Mind” with Julie Rose

Christopher T. Lewis, Assistant Professor of Portuguese & Brazilian Studies in the Department of World Languages & Cultures, was featured Friday on “Top of Mind” with Julie Rose on BYU Radio

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L2TrecL2TReC Wins Language Training Center Competition

L2TReC was selected by The Defense Language and National Security Education Office (DLNSEO) as a Language Training Center (LTC) Program winner.

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John James Audubon Print Exhibition

Ongoing through Friday, September 9, 2016
Marriott Library - J. Willard (M LIB)

Housed in the Rare Books Department of Special Collections, 12 of these stunning pieces feature mammals from Audubon’s imperial folio “The Quadrupeds of North America.” The remaining print, entitled “Black Vulture/Carrion Crow,” is from Audubon’s landmark book “The Birds of America,” which contains 435 plates of birds and is one of the most famous and highly valued publications in American history.


Love Letters: A Gallery of Type

Ongoing through Friday, September 30, 2016
Marriott Library - J. Willard (M LIB)

From Gutenberg to Bruce Rogers and beyond, see examples from the 15th through the 20th centuries of why we love type.


GCSC Seminar: "Rethinking Sustainability to Deal with the Climate Change Trickster: Resilience Theory, the Anthropocene, and the Example of Marine Fisheries"

Tuesday, August 30, 2016, 4 - 5pm
Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building (ASB)

Climate change and the Anthropocene call into question the efficacy of sustainability goals embedded in environmental and natural resources law and policy. This talk, based on Professor Craig's and Professor Melinda Harm Benson's forthcoming book, THE END OF SUSTAINABILITY, offers a new framework for natural resources law and policy in the 21st century through the lens of marine fisheries management. Specifically, this talk will look at the discipline of resilience theory, which could helpfully update the mechanistic view of nature embedded in U.S. environmental law, and the cultural narrative of the trickster, which could more helpfully inform U.S. responses to a world of unpredictable and continuous natural change.


GCSC Seminar: "Rethinking Sustainability to Deal with the Climate Change Trickster: Resilience Theory, the Anthropocene, and the Example of Marine Fisheries"

Tuesday, August 30, 2016, 4 - 5pm
Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building (ASB)

Climate change and the Anthropocene call into question the efficacy of sustainability goals embedded in environmental and natural resources law and policy. This talk, based on Professor Craig's and Professor Melinda Harm Benson's forthcoming book, THE END OF SUSTAINABILITY, offers a new framework for natural resources law and policy in the 21st century through the lens of marine fisheries management. Specifically, this talk will look at the discipline of resilience theory, which could helpfully update the mechanistic view of nature embedded in U.S. environmental law, and the cultural narrative of the trickster, which could more helpfully inform U.S. responses to a world of unpredictable and continuous natural change.


Philosophy Colloquium Series presents Neil Sinhababu from the National University of Singapore

Thursday, September 1, 2016, 2:30 - 4:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

More information will be coming soon.


Philosophy Department Colloquium Series presents Neil Sinhababu from the National University of Singapore

Friday, September 2, 2016, 2:30 - 4:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

Title: A Reliable Route from Is to Ought Abstract: I present a strategy by which moral knowledge can be derived from nonmoral knowledge, using insights from reliabilist epistemology. The strategy begins by discovering which cognitive processes generate which moral and nonmoral beliefs. We can then assess the reliability of these cognitive processes for moral belief formation by considering to what extent they produce true belief on nonmoral issues, and by checking whether they produce contradictory moral beliefs in different people. By retaining reliably caused beliefs and abandoning unreliably caused ones, we can move closer to moral truth. No normative ethical assumptions are required.


ENVST Capstone

Thursday, September 8 - Sunday, September 11, 2016
Taft-Nicholson Center


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Last Updated: 8/26/16